Posts Tagged ‘Patrick Procktor’

Here as promised are details of the artworks featured in my last post. Because I drifted around snapping only the pieces that immediately appealed to me without taking much notice at the time  of pricing, this year’s selection has turned out to be rather over the top from a financial point of view.  Apart from a couple. But there is art available at the Royal Academy that wouldn’t break the bank…so if you get the chance to see for yourself, then I’d recommend getting a ticket.

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“ALL THE FISH IN THE SEA” by David Mach, RA £56,000

 

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“MIGRATION” by Cathy de Monchaux £35,000

 

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“GOLDENGROVE” by Christopher le Brun £168,000

 

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“SATCHEL” and “LIBERTY BODICE” by Valerie Bradbury £500 each

 

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“VENICE TRIPTYCH” by Ken Howard RA £20,000

 

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“SPRING GARDEN, UNDER FROST” by Frederick Cuming RA £25,000

 

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“SNOW IN HYDE PARK” By Ken Howard RA £38,000

 

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“AVOCADO COCONUT EGG (ACE) by El Anatsui Hon RA Price on application!

 

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“KOZANJI: WINTER FIRE” by Ian MacKenzie Smith £4,000

Now, since I went to the exhibition and made my selection and with the Olympics about to burst forth, I settled down the other night and watched an interesting documentary about Tom Daley, Britain’s high-diving medal hope. When I next looked at that last painting, above, all I can see now are a pair of blue Speedo’s and some yellow legs behind a wafting scarlet scarf. Funny how perceptions can be changed, isn’t it?

Oh, and if I were to make a choice and money was no object, then from the above selection I’d probably go for Frederick Cuming’s ‘Spring Garden, Under Frost.’ (I like the colours which remind me slightly of a Patrick Procktor painting a friend once owned).  I discounted the bottle top wall-hanging on account of its size and also because I imagine it would need dusting. Ever practical when it comes to housework avoidance, you see!

The Summer Exhibition  runs until 21 August. Galleries open at 10.00am until 6.00pm, late evenings till 10pm on Fridays and Saturdays.

 

 

 

 

 

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Living close to places of interest often means we pass them by, assuming we’ll get round to visiting some time or another, which is what has happened with me and Chichester Cathedral. I had never been inside, until this week when, after meeting friends for lunch in the town, I remedied this oversight. On first impression, the interior is very much like any other cathedral – except that there is a rather stunning altar piece tapestry designed by John Piper, paintings by Patrick Procktor and Graham Sutherland and a beautiful stained glass window by Marc Chagall.

Depiction of Psalm 150, Marc Chagall, Chichester Cathedral

Depiction of Psalm 150, Marc Chagall, Chichester Cathedral

This immediately brought to mind an outing I took last year with my mother – on her suggestion that she and I visit a tiny church in the Kent village of Tudeley. She had been before, and thought I’d be interested.

I was. I was astonished.

All Saints' Tudeley

All Saints’ Tudeley

Views across the Weald of Kent

Views across the Weald of Kent

All Saints’ Tudeley sits nestled in beautiful countryside, overlooking the Weald. From the outside, although pretty, it looks similar to many other small churches in this area, but inside…well, the inside is unbelievable.

The walls are whitewashed which complements the stonework and instantly this evokes an airy atmosphere of meditative calm.

Light through the windows onto white walls and honeyed stonework

Light through the windows onto white walls and honeyed stonework

The windows, all twelve of them, were designed by Marc Chagall. It is the only church in the world to have all its windows decorated by the Russian artist – and it’s only here in the UK and in Chichester where his stained glass can be appreciated.

Chagall was originally commissioned to design the east window at Tudeley in 1963 for Sir Henry and Lady d’Avigdor-Goldsmid in memory of their daughter.

Window commissioned as a memorial to a drowned daughter

Window commissioned as a memorial to a drowned daughter

He had been searching for a place of worship in which to display his stained glass since being disappointed at his artificially lit windows, depicting the Twelve Tribes of Israel, at the synagogue of the Hassadah Medical Centre in Jerusalem. When he arrived at Tudeley for the inauguration in 1967, he was so taken by its simplicity and natural light that he agreed to decorate all the windows.

An abstraction of butterflies

An abstraction of butterflies

The final windows to be installed, those of the chancel, were fitted in 1985 – the year of Chagall’s death.

Find out more about the church at Tudeley here.

Churches seem to house the most unexpected works of art which, unless you visit on the off chance and discover them for yourself or you hear by word of mouth, these treasures are likely to remain hidden forever.

John Piper's tapestry at the altar, Chichester Cathedral

John Piper’s tapestry at the altar, Chichester Cathedral

Noli me Tangere, by Graham Sutherland, tucked away in Chichester Cathedral

Noli me Tangere, by Graham Sutherland, tucked away in Chichester Cathedral

Read more about Chichester Cathedral here.

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